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Stand By for Oz Buzz

The Huntington’s disease World Congress starts this weekend. Follow @HDBuzzFeed for live updates, check out HDBuzz.net for the latest news and videos, and send us your questions for the top HD scientists.

Oz Buzz – live from The World Congress on Huntington’s disease

The World Congress on Huntington’s disease is the biggest international meeting of HD scientists, care professionals and family members. The 2011 World Congress begins in Melbourne, Australia this Sunday – 11th September.

Your HDBuzz editors – Dr Jeff Carroll and Dr Ed Wild – have teamed up with Emmy award-winning broadcaster Charles Sabine to present Oz Buzz – reporting live from the World Congress. In the spirit of HDBuzz, we’ll be bringing the most exciting scientific news to the global HD community.

Follow HDBuzzFeed on Twitter for live updates

Throughout the World Congress, Ed and Jeff will be using Twitter to post plain language news updates, in real time, from within the science sessions. So if you want the very hottest news, as it happens, follow @HDBuzzFeed.

Daily updates at HDBuzz.net

Each evening, we’ll post a new article to HDBuzz.net, containing all the day’s science updates from the Congress. Like any HDBuzz article, you’ll be able to read it at HDBuzz.net, on the community websites that use the HDBuzz feed, and in your inbox, if you’ve signed up to receive our email updates.

Oz Buzz live on stage

On the evenings of Monday 12th and Tuesday 13th September, Jeff, Ed and Charles will present Oz Buzz live, featuring the news headlines from the day, and in-depth interviews with top HD researchers – all in easy-to-understand language – plus some entertaining features on the social life behind the Congress and the host city of Melbourne.

Video of the live sessions will be available to watch at HDBuzz.net within a few hours after the session.

Oz Buzz needs you!

We’ll be interviewing three top scientists each night – and we want you to send us questions for them. Now’s your chance to get an answer to that burning question you’ve been wondering about, straight from the horse’s mouth. The scientists we’ll be interviewing, and the areas we’ll be covering, are:

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  • Dr Frank Bennett of Isis Pharmaceuticals – gene silencing therapy

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  • Dr Tony Hannan of Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Melbourne – environmental factors that can influence HD onset and progression

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  • Prof Leslie Thompson of University of California Irvine – how our DNA and the huntingtin protein are chemically modified by cells

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  • Dr Rachael Scahill of University College London – how magnetic resonance imaging will help us to run clinical trials in HD

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  • Prof Steve Finkbeiner of Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease – how cells handle harmful proteins

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  • Prof Paul Muchowski of Gladstone -targeting the immune system to help brain cells to survive

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You can send us your questions in several ways:

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  • By email to worldcongress@hdbuzz.net

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  • Tweet us – @HDBuzzFeed

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  • Record your question on YouTube and send us the link by email or tweet

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Please tell us your name (or nickname) and what country you’re in. Send your questions any time – before or during the Congress – and the best ones will be asked during the live session.

We hope you enjoy our World Congress coverage – we aim to make it the most accessible international research meeting the global HD community has seen.

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Latest Research Articles

Treatment for neurological disorder could be repurposed for Huntington’s disease patients

Published date: 22 October, 2020

While developing a drug called branaplam for patients with SMA, the pharmaceutical company Novartis discovered that it could hold promise for people with HD. The FDA has granted a special status called Orphan Drug Designation to branaplam. An existing drug…for huntingtin lowering? The pharmaceutical company Novartis has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Read more Treatment for neurological disorder could be repurposed for Huntington’s disease patients

Updates from the EHDN Plenary Meeting 2020

Published date: 9 October, 2020

In September, the European Huntington’s Disease Network (EHDN) hosted a virtual webinar event which comprised presentations on some of the latest scientific research as well as clinical studies of Huntington’s disease (HD). Researchers, doctors, patients and other interested folks, tuned in for an afternoon of talks as well as question and answer sessions to learn ... Read more Updates from the EHDN Plenary Meeting 2020

Sad news from the SIGNAL study: pepinemab does not influence HD symptoms

Published date: 23 September, 2020

The SIGNAL clinical trial was designed to test a drug called pepinemab in people with early Huntington’s disease. The key results of that trial were recently announced, and unfortunately, pepinemab did not slow or improve HD symptoms as hoped. What was the SIGNAL trial, and who participated? The SIGNAL trial was launched in 2015 by ... Read more Sad news from the SIGNAL study: pepinemab does not influence HD symptoms

When genes are unstable: targeting somatic instability in HD

Published date: 8 September, 2020

What is somatic instability? We tend to think of DNA as a fixed blueprint, an overarching plan for the biological bricks and bridges that constitute our cells, organs, and bodies. But like any good plan, DNA is actually dynamic and adaptable. It gets frequent use as a template for creating the RNA messages that pave ... Read more When genes are unstable: targeting somatic instability in HD

Working as a team: Changes in brain development mean some brain regions may be slacking off

Published date: 17 August, 2020

The effect of the HD genetic expansion on brain development has been a hot topic in HD research. A team of researchers led by Dr. Sandrine Humbert at the Grenoble Institut Neurosciences, examined human fetal tissue to show that the mutant HD gene causes very early changes in the patterns of early brain development. But ... Read more Working as a team: Changes in brain development mean some brain regions may be slacking off

Caution urged for the use of gene-editing technology CRISPR

Published date: 12 August, 2020

A gene-editing tool known as CRISPR has been heralded as a breakthrough technology for scientists in the lab but also as a potential strategy to treat numerous genetic diseases, including Huntington’s. But a series of recent studies has suggested that CRISPR is less precise than previously thought, leading to unintended changes in the genome. Three ... Read more Caution urged for the use of gene-editing technology CRISPR

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