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The 2013 HDBuzz Prize for Young Science Writers

We’re pleased to announce the 2013 HDBuzz Prize, an opportunity for early-career Huntington’s disease researchers to get involved in communicating HD science to the global community, see their work published here and win US$500 in Amazon vouchers!

Calling all HD scientists

After the success of the inaugural HDBuzz prize last year, we’re again looking for young scientists with a gift for communicating research news clearly and imaginatively.

So we’re excited to be announcing the 2013 HDBuzz Prize for Young Science Writers.

The HDBuzz prize is open to PhD students and postdoctoral researchers with an active involvement in any aspect of Huntington’s disease research.

Entrants should write an article of strictly no more than 1200 words, suitable for publication by HDBuzz, about a recent Huntington’s disease research paper.

In addition to the article, each submission must contain:

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  • a headline of no more than 10 words
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  • a front-page summary of no more than 50 words
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  • a Tweet of no more than 115 characters including spaces
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  • at least one reference to a peer-reviewed article forming the subject of the piece
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Need inspiration?

Entrants are free to choose any paper or topic, but we are also happy to suggest topics. You should not write about your own work or research you’ve been directly involved in. Email [email protected] if you’d like some suggestions.

The closing date for entries is Friday 15th November at 5pm London time.

Entries should be submitted by email, in Word document format, to [email protected]

All entries must be written in English. We regret that entries in other languages will not be considered.

Prizes!

The winners will be announced in December 2013.

The winning article will be published on HDBuzz, translated into eleven languages and syndicated to dozens of HD community sites worldwide.

The winner will receive Amazon vouchers to the value of US$500 in the currency of their choice.

Up to five runners up will also have their articles published and receive US$200 in Amazon vouchers.

Public engagement is important for every scientist’s training, so apart from the cash, this would enhance the CV of any eager young HD researcher.

Tips for successful writing

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  1. Take a look at several HDBuzz articles before you start, to get a good feel for our tone and style.

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  3. If in doubt, simplify.

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  5. Assume that your reader is interested in HD and willing to learn, but has no formal science training.

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  7. Explain anything beyond high-school science, in bite-sized steps. Then go back and explain the high-school science.

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  9. Apply metaphor, analogy, humor and silliness generously.

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  11. Remember to explore the limitations of what you’re writing about and try to explain what needs to happen next for it to bring HD treatments closer.

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  13. Feel free to create or use simple diagrams, striking photos or cartoons to help illustrate the article. But avoid pictures that contain text, as this causes translation problems.

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The small print

The editors' decision is final and correspondence will not be entered into. By submitting an entry, you agreeing to allow editing of your article for style and content, and its publication via HDBuzz.net and release under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License including translation and unlimited syndication. Winners agree to be named at HDBuzz.net. Entry is not available to previous prize winners or runners up, though previous entrants who did not win are most welcome to try again. All entries will be scrutinized for plagiarism and disqualified if it is found. Side effects may include uncontrollable vomiting. Elevators may go down as well as up.

Help us twist arms!

Whether you’re a Principal Investigator (that’s ‘top boffin’ in tabloid-speak) or HD family member, chances are you know a young scientist with a neat turn of phrase and a gift for communication.

If so, please put them in touch with us or send them to this article, so they can think about entering the prize.

‘Public and patient engagement’ is important for every scientist’s training, so apart from the chance of getting their hands on those delicious prizes, this is something that would enhance the CV of any eager young HD researcher.

So, eggheads – get in touch and get cracking!

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